The Etiquette Of Following And Unfollowing

November 3, 2009 by  
Filed under General Twitter Tips

When you first sign up to Twitter, things will move very slowly comparatively speaking. The simple truth of the matter is that when you only have a couple of people in your feed and they are not online at the time, you won’t have much to read. There are ways to speed things up. Adding your favorite newspaper – they almost always have a Twitter account, a couple of TV stations, some sports teams and a celeb or two will keep the tweets coming, albeit maybe not as immediately relevant as you would like. You should also find out which of your friends are on Twitter. Following them will give you a chance to swap jokes and chit chat when you’re apart.

After a while, through re-tweets from your friends and people picking up and following your feed, names will become familiar and you can add them if you feel so inclined. Before too long you will be getting more tweets than you want to read – and then comes the decision of who to “unfollow”. This can be a more stressful pursuit than you think, because some people check their followers page frequently and they often do it when they notice their numbers have dropped. You may get an angry or hurt response from someone you unfollowed.

Should you be worried or reluctant to unfollow someone because of this? It depends on how you feel about getting those messages. As long as you are confident in telling someone that your feed went too fast and you had a little cull, you shouldn’t be too worried. Failing that, you can always just ignore their tweets!

Twitter Skeptics And Their Reasons

November 3, 2009 by  
Filed under General Twitter Tips

The amazing growth of Twitter would defy all the laws of fast-growing phenomena if it did not have its detractors. And it is unquestionable that Twitter does, very much, have people queuing up to find fault with it. It would be dishonest to suggest, too, that all of these detractors were arguing from a position of ignorance. Many of them know what they are talking about – and many, indeed, do not. But what are the arguments against Twitter?

It is frequently said that Twitter is boring and banal. There is a sliver of truth in this belief, especially if you read tweets from people who are not particularly eloquent or interesting. Yes, a lot of people hate their boss. Some people can be amusing about how they hate their boss, and others can be spectacularly boring about it. By the same token, no-one says that speaking out loud is boring and banal, and we have all had conversations with people who are spectacularly boring to us.

Other detractors say that Twitter distracts people from talking to each other in the old fashioned way, directly face to face. And while this view has its merits, the same is true of e-mail, telephones, letter-writing and semaphore. Others argue that the 140-character limit encourages the use of “text speech”. There is a great deal of truth in this, but one has only to look around at some of the more eloquent feeds to see that even in 140 characters, it is possible to say something interesting and spell it perfectly. In the end, some people like Twitter and some hate it – which describes hundreds of thousands of other things, too.

The Perils Of Immediacy

November 3, 2009 by  
Filed under General Twitter Tips

It is often said that one of the best things about Twitter is that it updates in real time, and that when things are flowing well it is not unlike being at a party, or at least a reasonably lively meeting. But there are two sides to every coin, and it is worth taking account of the fact that immediacy can make things very hard to take back, particularly when the information you have posted is sensitive, and/or is reported quickly by other people in such a way as to make you look stupid or expose something you would rather not have said or done.

If you are in the jaws of a negative mood – be it sad, depressed or angry – then it is possible that you will make the mistake of saying something that you will later wish to take back. If you add alcohol into the situation, as many do, then it lowers the inhibitions which would usually prevent you from saying such things. Sitting in front of the world’s most immediate information exchange, you can easily go over the line and do something idiotic. Posting personal details about an ex, making unwanted advances to another individual, or just saying something that makes you look like a moron – that sounds bad, yes?

Now imagine that what you say is re-tweeted by someone either innocently or maliciously. You can delete your own tweet if you regret it swiftly, but it is still there in another person’s feed. Put simply, if you don’t want it to be common knowledge, don’t Tweet it.

The Phenomenon Of Crowdsourcing

November 3, 2009 by  
Filed under General Twitter Tips

When you have a job that needs to be done and you are not that keen to do it yourself, then you could very well decide to ask someone else to do it. This is known as “outsourcing” the job, and has been a part of business for a very long time. With the increased popularity of social networking it has become possible to get work or information from a greater number of people. This is the age of “crowdsourcing”. It is becoming very popular.

Crowdsourcing is a phenomenon which would be all but impossible without the Internet. There is no more convenient way of getting a message to a wide range of people than placing it on the Internet where it can be read by anyone who happens to stumble across it, or find it buried in the middle of their Twitter feed. Whether you need to know about good restaurants in a city you are visiting for the first time, or the lyrics in the first line of a song, posting your query on Twitter should get you a flood of helpful replies.

If this sounds a lot like placing a question or an advertisement on a bulletin board, it is. But the difference between Twitter and a bulletin board is that Twitter stretches across the world and the replies are automatic. It is bigger, and it is faster and this is just one reason why Twitter has become hugely popular and is relied upon by so many.

Are You Tweeting Too Much?

November 3, 2009 by  
Filed under General Twitter Tips

The first time you sign on to Twitter, you will be greeted by a question at the top of the screen which may seem impertinent. The line of text says, in full, “What Are You Doing?”. The literal answer to this may not be anything particularly interesting. Indeed, it may be “Logging on to Twitter”. It may go without saying, but this question need not be answered in full every time you read it. The more basic and banal your Twitter updates are, the less likely people are to follow you. That’s not to say that you can never post basic updates, but if you tell people every time you sneeze, they’re going to lose interest.

People follow Twitter these days by a wide and varied range of means, including via a feed client which posts new updates on their desktop at graduated intervals. If someone sees that they have twenty new tweets to read, and then discovers that fifteen of them are from you talking about how your toaster isn’t working, then they’d better be very funny updates on the toaster situation or you will lose followers. Quality is more important than quantity, or at least as important.

Of course, your tweeting style should reflect the audience you want to read your tweets. Not everybody is Oscar Wilde, and not everybody wants to read Oscar Wilde anyway. Your tweets should, when it comes down to it, reflect your personality more than anything, and if that personality is simple and unassuming, then your tweets don’t need to be about rescuing people from fires or performing at Carnegie Hall.

Slang Of The Twitterverse

November 3, 2009 by  
Filed under General Twitter Tips

Every phenomenon that spreads quickly around the world must come complete with its own lexicon of slang. Being a heavily text-based phenomenon, Twitter is perhaps a more complete example of this than any other. Starting with the practice of writing a message on Twitter, or “Tweeting”, this slang refers to a great deal of other topics as well. If you wish to send a message to one specific user, you use the @ symbol followed by their ID, and this is known as an “at-reply”. If they do not wish for this message to show up in their feed for the notice of other users, they may send it as a direct message, or simply “DM”.

Of course one of the most commonly used pieces of slang is “re-tweeting”, which is largely self-explanatory, referring as it does to the practice of copying and crediting the “tweet” of another user. It is not dissimilar to a chain e-mail. Then there is the list of tweets that you read from fellow users. The tweets themselves turn up in what is known as your “feed”. Your feed will be particularly busy if you “follow” a lot of people – which is the fairly obvious slang for reading their tweets.

A piece of slang which is not limited to Twitter but has found its natural home there is “Crowdsourcing”. This refers to asking a question or requesting a favor via Twitter which, when read by your followers, will gain you a lot of information or help from a number of people – or a crowd.

Please Re-Tweet Me…

November 3, 2009 by  
Filed under General Twitter Tips

If someone told you back in 2008 that one day they would re-tweet you, you would have probably called a doctor and stayed with them until such time as the emergency services arrived. The word sounds bizarre and even a little bit embarrassing, but it has become common currency among Twitter users. Essentially, a re-tweet is when someone picks up on a “Tweet” you have made and, attaching your Twitter ID by means of an @ sign, lets their own followers know what you have said. Depending on how large their number of followers is, it could get you quite a lot of attention.

This occasionally leads to the phenomenon of users writing Tweets which are obviously designed to be re-tweeted, usually ones which deal with a topical issue and are at least passably funny, or at least thought-provoking. The upshot of this is that some users have “feeds” (lists of Tweets) that are made up almost entirely of re-tweets. This type of follower gets un-followed very quickly by a lot of users, who are generally sick of reading the same thing repeatedly.

Re-tweeting is one way in which messages can spread from a single account to multiple feeds in a very short space of time, and is often used by political parties or commercial enterprises to drum up publicity in a very short space of time for little or no cost. Many people, though, will continue to wish it was called something other than “re-tweeting”, for what it’s worth.

Celebrity Tweeters

November 3, 2009 by  
Filed under General Twitter Tips

Social networking was doing perfectly fine before the explosion of Twitter, but the site has taken things to the next level. While the previous king of the social networking hill, Facebook, is considered by many to be a little bit too exposed (carrying as it does far more personal information), the Twitter revolution has become a way for celebrities and their fans to become far more connected than ever before. Celebrities have gone for Twitter in a way that makes the other social networking sites look slow by comparison – and the effects of this are quite fascinating.

Of course politicians have been swift to see the possibilities of Twitter, and of course their Tweets are relatively anodyne – a policy announcement here, a publicity statement for a public appearance there. They’re not going to Tweet their deepest thoughts. Nonetheless Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton and many others have got accounts. Actors such as Will Wheaton and pop stars such as Britney Spears and Courtney Love have got accounts too, and update with varying degrees of frequency and candid-ness.

One of the most prolific, and heavily followed users of Twitter is the UK actor and comedian Stephen Fry. He has become something of an unofficial spokesman for the phenomenon in his native United Kingdom and posts candidly and frequently on a range of subjects. Many users consider it an honor to receive a direct reply from a celebrity user – and it happens far more frequently than one would think. It must be something to do with the lack of regulation.

The Power Of Twitter

November 3, 2009 by  
Filed under General Twitter Tips

It is quite something to behold, how a website with a healthy but comparatively low number of users just one year ago could become one of the most powerful tools in the information sector. Twitter has become the tool for people who want something to become known widespread in a short space of time – and has had a major effect on the careers of individuals, and the way that people find out news if they are on the move or in a setting where standard web surfing or watching the television is not possible.

If someone does, or says something ill-advised, it will end up on the Internet very quickly. The power of Twitter is that, very quickly, someone can post a link to the website where that information is posted. This will then be read by everyone who is “following” the person who posted the link. They can then repost it, and from the point where it was originally posted, it can be spread around the world within minutes. It is no wonder that some individuals are fearful of the spread of Twitter, and others overjoyed by its existence. It is the gossip-monger’s dream.

There is some debate over whether the existence of a website – although it is by now much more than just a site – which allows such swift transfer of information is a good thing. Certainly you either love or hate the absence of immediate moderation which allows rumors to take flight so easily – but it is hard to remain indifferent.

Tweet, Tweet

November 3, 2009 by  
Filed under General Twitter Tips

Every once in a while, particularly since the internet shrunk the world down so small you could fit it in your pocket, there comes a phenomenon which very quickly takes the world by storm and gets people talking. Other people hear these people and want to know more. As night follows day, it goes from a niche, little-known pursuit for enthusiasts to something that you cannot avoid no matter how much you try to ignore it. in 2009, that thing has been Twitter. At the start of the year it was mildly popular, and as it comes to a close it is something that has grown wings.

The “wings” metaphor is an appropriate one, given that “twitter” was previously a word used to describe a noise made by birds. As things stand today it may never go back to being that, because if someone describes a flock of “twittering birds”, the image that will form in many people’s mind is of a bunch of sparrows with laptops sending each other short comments and links to YouTube videos. Politicians use it to gauge support, news agencies use it to break stories quickly, and writers churn out articles about it. If you don’t know what Twitter is, maybe you never will – or maybe you’ll go and check it out right now.

Writing a message on Twitter is known as “tweeting”, and people seem to be entirely comfortable with that idea. If you repeat someone else’s message by copying and pasting, this is known as “re-tweeting”. The jargon may sound idiotic, but by force of numbers it has become the done thing.

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